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A Place for Your Stuff - George Carlin

Getting Organized in the Era of Endless

SQUALL PRESS, the publishing division of FileHeads, is pleased to announce Getting Organized in the Era of Endless: What to Do When Information, Interruption, Work and Stuff are Endless But Time is Not!
Order yours today!

Posts Tagged ‘information’

What Neuroscience tells us about Getting Organized

Monday, October 20, 2014 @ 10:10 AM
posted by admin

Excerpt from the Washington Post

We’ve all heard the conventional wisdom for better managing our time and organizing our professional and personal lives. Don’t try to multitask. Turn the email and Facebook alerts off to help stay focused. Make separate to-do lists for tasks that require a few minutes, a few hours and long-term planning.

But what’s grounded in real evidence and what’s not? In his new book The Organized Mind, Daniel Levitin — a McGill University professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience — explores how having a basic understanding of the way the brain works can help us think about organizing our homes, our businesses, our time and even our schools in an age of information overload.

Click here to read the interview with Levitin about why multi-tasking never works, what images of good leaders’ brains actually look like, and why email and Twitter are so incredibly addicting.

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New Educational Products

Wednesday, July 9, 2014 @ 03:07 PM
posted by admin

Listen to the recording “Reining In Information Turn-on” to learn more about the latest science on how information turns us on and causes us to want to seek out even more, and strategies for determining when enough is enough, and how to use new stopping points.

We are wirelessly tethered 24/7 to family, friends, fans, co-workers, customers, clients, vendors, suppliers, and perfect and imperfect strangers. The line between work-life and home-life is getting more and more blurry. Listen to the recording “Coping with Endless Connectivity” and learn how to formulate a Family Technology Policy to balance your digital and non-digital life.

In the Era of Endless information in which we live, our information has an “afterlife”: it goes on without us!  We all have a website, Facebook pages, online accounts, and other digital assets. The recording, “Information Afterlife and Digital Estate Planning” teaches you how to manage your digital assets to protect your information and pass on your digital assets in the event of your demise.

In “We Are All Time Managers”, you’ll learn new time management skills appropriate to the digital age like how to ‘triage’ your commitments, projects and to-dos.

The recordings are perfect for parents, educators, psychologists, professional organizers, and business coaches. You can purchase each teleclass recording individually or the entire series at a discount.

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Information Junkies

Wednesday, July 9, 2014 @ 03:07 PM
posted by admin

My client, Ann client calls her husband Joe “an information junkie.” Ann needed a new car and Joe was eager to help her find one. He researched consumer reports. Joe asked his online friends, fans and followers what they thought of particular vehicles. He watched Youtube videos of the cars in action and set up Google alerts. Joe amassed an enormous amount of information. Ann says “Joe keeps thinking there is just a little bit more information out there to find and we’ll know exactly which car to buy.” He’s right. There is a little bit more information, in fact, there is no end to the information that can be found to answer a question, solve a problem, make a point or satisfy a curiosity.  The problem for Ann is that Joe’s “help” delays her car purchase. “He doesn’t know how to stop”, Ann says.

And as if endless information were not enough, it turns out that Joe is turned-on by information. What do I mean? Information turn-on is like gambling. My mother loves to gamble. On her 91st birthday, we went to Harrah’s Cherokee casino. They play a sound track of coins tumbling out of the machines: ca-ching, ca-ching, ca-ching. Just the sound of money plopping out entices Mom to sit at that machine. She’s hooked. When a person gambles, the brain releases dopamine, a neurochemical that the brain loves like your tongue likes sugar. Turns out that the tendency to pursue new information has a similar effect. The ping of a text or bing of an incoming email can light up parts of the brain once thought only to be ignited by drugs, sex and gambling.

If you don’t know when to stop or tend to fall into the black hole of the Internet, here are some tips for you:

Tips for Information Junkies

  • Learn how to search more efficiently. Go to www.google.com/insidesearch/tipstricks/basics.html to brush up.
  • Your social network will be full of opinions so limit this kind of input.
  • Choose two or three professional sources and/or experts (who are not paid for their opinion.)
  • Make your search well-rounded and then STOP. Well-rounded might include several live experts, up to three authoritative blogs or podcasts, and a few choice YouTube videos plus your Internet search.
  • Set a time limit for your research/search.

And remember, since there is no end to the amount of information, points of view, perspectives, arguments, “facts” and claims you can gather from others, at some point, you need to draw your own conclusion, formulate an opinion, or make a decision. These are great stopping points.

A professional organizer can help you organize your search, set goals, and manage your time. You can find one at www.napo.net .

If you cannot stop, are neglecting your time with your live family and friends, or have a high dose of perfectionism, consult a professional counselor.

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Endless Connectivity

Thursday, January 30, 2014 @ 03:01 PM
posted by admin

Coping with Endless Connectivity Teleclass
Thursday March 20, 2014, 8pm – 9pm ET       Price: $79.00

We are wirelessly tethered 24/7 to family, friends, fans, co-workers, customers, clients, vendors, suppliers, and perfect and imperfect strangers. The overall effect of endless connectivity is to blur the line between work and leisure. Even leisure-like activities like sharing family videos on Facebook, commenting on blogs, and following people on Twitter all take time. Time lost to endless connectivity includes family time, face-time, and real-time leisure. A Family Technology Policy helps you balance digital activities with non-digital activities, sets boundaries for the use of the devices inside of family life, and reclaims real-time activities. Every family is different. These guidelines will enable you to custom-build a Family Technology Policy.  (For those in the organizing trade, creating a family technology policy can be directly transferred to your clients, increasing your service offerings, and enhancing your unique value.)

** Classes are recorded. Registrants have access to mp3 audio recordings of each class in case you miss one!

Register for Coping with Endless Connectivity Teleclass

Add to Cart

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See all other classes:

Reining in Information Turn-on, March 19, 2014

Information Afterlife and Digital Estate Planning, April 17, 2014

We’re All Time Managers, April 23, 2014

Organizing in the Era of Endless, 4 Teleclass Series

Any questions, please contact our Teleclass Techie, Allison Carter, at theorganizer@gmail.com,
or call (678) 439-8866

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Decision Making in the Era of Endless Information

Saturday, April 28, 2012 @ 06:04 AM
posted by admin

Making decisions is a good use of time. Decision-making moves a myriad of little daily tasks along to accomplishment, allows us to make progress on complex projects, and keeps us on the path toward goal achievement. In the Era of Endless when information never ends, decision-making is profoundly impacted. Endlessly adding data, more information, and inputs leaves us precious little time to stand back and put all the pieces together. Take the example of the April, 2010 BP oil spill. Within hours of the spill the Incident Commander of the Coast Guard (the person in charge) received 400 pages of e-mails, texts, reports, and other messages. “I might have acted faster if there was less input,” he commented. 

Endless information can also cause some people to freeze altogether when it comes to decisions. We choose the default 401k plan at work or automatically renew our health insurance policy without considering alternatives because “there is just too much information.”

Endless information can bring decision-making to its knees. To avoid this:

  • Pick a time in the information-gathering process to step back, to see the novel connections, detect hidden patterns that emerge and apply judgment about what missing information still needs to be sought.
  • Add a time frame to your decisions. A decision has no power if it is made too late.
  • Since information is endless but time is not, add a limit to how much time you will devote to finding information.
  • Consider team-based decision-making. Divide up the information gathering process between several people, each person share’s the information, and then as a group based on the information, a consensual decision is made

Remember, in the era of endless, there can be no end to the quantity of information we find to solve a problem, address a need or make a decision. Trade in quanity for quality.

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