Blog Notifiations

Stay organized and updated with our latest posts


A Place for Your Stuff - George Carlin

Getting Organized in the Era of Endless

SQUALL PRESS, the publishing division of FileHeads, is pleased to announce Getting Organized in the Era of Endless: What to Do When Information, Interruption, Work and Stuff are Endless But Time is Not!
Order yours today!

Posts Tagged ‘ADHD’

What To Do When You are Overwhelmed and Overloaded: A Get It Done Guide

Wednesday, June 7, 2017 @ 05:06 AM
posted by admin

What To Do When You Are Overwhelmed & Overloaded: A Get It Done Guide | Fileheads.net

These tips originally appeared on ADDitude and were written by Judith Kolberg

You can’t hide from your to-do list forever. Use these 11 strategies for de-cluttering, managing paper, overcoming distractions, and getting things done.

Overcome the Overload

Every day we’re confronted with information, distractions, work and lots of other stuff. Is it a surprise anyone gets anything done, never mind those with attention deficit? People with ADHD are easily overwhelmed by the fast pace and interruptions, so they need some stay-focused strategies to keep them on track. Consider this your “how to get things done” guide.

Capture All That Information

Instead of going crazy trying to write down all those bits of information that come your way, try these solutions:

  • Call important information into your voicemail and leave yourself messages.
  • Convert verbal information into text, using an app like Dragon Dictation.
  • Store your text messages in one place using an app called Treasuremytext.

Finish Something, Anything, Early in the Day

Completing a chore – a small task or something larger that you worked on yesterday – gives you a sense of closure, making the rest of the day meaningful. No matter how the day goes, you can say you got something done, which gives you a sense of satisfaction that will encourage you to keep going the next day.

Get A Grip

If a phone call or a request from your spouse distracts you from a task you’re working on, hold onto a physical artifact to remind you what you were doing. An unopened envelope, for instance, will remind you that you were opening mail before the interruption, and will focus you attention more quickly.

Put It On The Calendar

It’s not enough to write down a task on your to-do list. You have to enter it into your calendar. Assigning a task to a specific day increases your chances of getting it done. With a to-do list only, you have a 40%-50% chance of doing the task. Scheduling the task increases your chances of completing it by 70% or so.

Just Do It

Don’t get overwhelmed about where or when to start a decluttering task. It doesn’t matter where you start; begin at any spot in the room. After you start, continue in some kind of logical order. If you start on the left side of the room, keep going to the left. If you start on the top shelf of a cabinet, work your way down.  There is no ideal way to tack clutter.

Manage the Mail

  • To cut off junk mail at its source, log onto catalogchoice.org and have them alert marketers to stop sending you stuff.
  • Have only one place for the day’s mail to land, maybe the dining room table. Yes, it piles up quickly, but at least you know where it will be when you decide to tackle it.
  • Don’t open junk mail. It can contain four to seven pieces of paper. Junk mail goes, unopened, right into the recycling bin.

Change the Scene

People with ADHD can optimize their focus and attention by doing different tasks in different kind of places. If you have to do your taxes, rent a room in a local hotel for a day or two. You can spread out all the papers and receipts, with fewer distractions that at home. Some people with attention deficit can’t get anything done – studying, writing, reading – in the quiet of a library. Finding a setting like a Starbucks (LINK) with some background noise, will help them be more productive.

Enlist a Support Team

Stop trying to be an ordinary person who keeps it all together in the same way that people without ADHD do. Support might mean another set of hands, someone to keep your morale up or someone to function as a body double. A body double is somebody who is physically present as you do a task but doesn’t to the task with you. Your body double anchors you to the chore at hand.

Switch Up Your Routine Every Quarter

People with ADHD get bored with their routines more quickly than those without the condition. The higher boredom factor keeps them from tackling things they once completed with ease. Routines – whether it’s opening mail, doing dishes or tackling a project at work – can be kept fresh by changing them up every three months. This doesn’t mean a complete overhaul, just a tweak.

Play It Loose With Deadlines

Schedule extra time to finish a task. Rather than trying to precisely estimate how lone a task will take, just say, “Screw it. I’m going to need 30 percent more time for everything I plan, no matter what.” Just pick a number: 20% more, 50% more and allot that. The worst that can happen is that you finish it early.

Keep Calm and Carry On

As you start your day, do the first three things that worry you the most to get them off your plate. The internal distraction of worry plays more on people with ADHD than on other people and prevents them from getting things done.  If you do any small part of what is worrying you, chance are you’ll break the anxiety and move forward.


Now available – the revised 2nd edition  ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Judith Kolberg and Dr. Kathleen G. Nadeau which offers the best understanding and solutions for adults with ADD who want to get and stay organized. Readers will enjoy all new content on organizing digital information, managing distractions, organizing finances, and coping with the “black hole” of the Internet. We also offer three levels of strategies and support: self-help, non-professional assistance from family and friends, and professional support; allowing the reader to determine the appropriate level of support. Pick up your copy today.

What To Do When You Are Overwhelmed & Overloaded: A Get It Done Guide | Fileheads.net

Did you like this? Share it:

Experts Praise ADD Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life

Friday, November 18, 2016 @ 06:11 AM
posted by admin

ADD Friendly Ways To Organize Your Life by Professional Organizer Judith Kolberg and Renowned Psychologist Dr. Kathleen G. Nadeau

 

 

Recently my co-author Dr. Kathleen G. Nadeau and I released a revised addition of our book ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life. With changes in our world since the book was first published in 2002, we felt it was time to update the book to include more information about  organizing digital information, managing distractions, organizing finances, and coping with the “black hole” of the Internet.

We are very honored to have some of the foremost experts in the fields of ADD and ADHD review our book. The response has been overwhelming. Here is what some of the experts are saying about the revised ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life.

“Simply the best book in the field, and not only for people with ADD but for anyone who is overwhelmed.” —Dr. Ned Hallowell, Child & Adult Psychiatrist

 

ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life was a godsend for me when it was first published in 2002…in this new book is the section on getting organized in the digital world. Those chapters alone are worth the price of the book!” —Paul O’Connor, Master Certified ADHD Coach, Secretary, The Professional Association Of ADHD Coaches

Randi Lyman reviews ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Judith Kolberg and Kathleen G. Nadeau, PhDADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life is a must read for my organizing clients and anyone that faces daily ADHD challenges. This comprehensive, easy to read book is packed full of helpful organizing ideas and strategies.” —Randi Lyman, CPO-CD® and Owner of A Helping Hand

 

 

Sandra Felton reviews ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Judith Kolberg and Kathleen G. Nadeau, PhD“While reflecting their years of successfully helping ADD clients, [Kolberg and Nadeau] manage to make their up-to-date information not only useful but FUN. Thanks a bunch, you two. It’s good to know somebody understands —and can help. This book does both.” —Sandra Felton The Organizer Lady®, Author of 5 Days to a Clutter Free House, and Founder of Messies Anonymous

 

Hilde Verdijk reviews ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Judith Kolberg and Kathleen G. Nadeau, PhD“That’s what I love about this book most of all: there is no more ‘waiting to be rescued’, no more excuses to sit back or give up. The simple and attainable strategies will boost our clients’ self-confidence and will help them prosper.” —Hilde Verdijk, CPO-CD®, MRPO®, Yourganize Professional Organizing

 

 

Ellen Delap reviews ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Judith Kolberg and Kathleen G. Nadeau, PhDADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life, 2nd Edition offers even more practical ADHD approaches on paper, digital, and time management situations. The chapter on decision making has especially valuable insights into ways to move into action.” —Ellen R. Delap, CPO®, President-Elect, National Association of Professional Organizers

 

Casey Moore reviews ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Judith Kolberg and Kathleen G. Nadeau, PhD“Packed with practical solutions and illuminating anecdotes, this new edition of ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life is a must-read for those who have ADD and those who work with them.” —Casey Moore, CPO, ACC, The Productivity Coach

 

 

 

Sari Solden reviews ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Judith Kolberg and Kathleen G. Nadeau, PhD“The new edition of ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Kolberg and Nadeau is simply wonderful and I will highly recommend it to all my clients!” —Sari Solden, MS, LMFT, Psychotherapist and Author of Women with Attention Deficit Disorder and Journeys Through ADDulthood

 

 

Kate Varness reviews ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life by Judith Kolberg and Kathleen G. Nadeau, PhD“This is the best book available on organizing with ADD.” —Kate Varness, CPO-CD, COC, MA, Editor of The ICD Guide to Challenging Disorganization: For Professional Organizers

 

 

 

If you would like to see what everyone is talking about especially if you or someone you love struggles with ADD and organizing, pick up your own copy of the ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life book.


The Authors

Professional Organizer and Author Judith KolbergJudith Kolberg formed FileHeads Professional Organizers in 1989. She is the founder of the National Study Group on Chronic Disorganization, the precursor to the Institute for Challenging Disorganization (ICD), a popular international speaker, and is widely recognized as an industry-thought leader. Chronically disorganized people of many stripes have embraced her non-traditional organizing methods as described in her five books, which have sold nearly a half million copies worldwide. Her latest book, Getting Organized in the Era of Endless, addresses the complex area of digital disorganization. Judith has held several leadership positions in the National Association of Professional Organizer (NAPO) and has been awarded the organizing industry’s highest honors. Judith resides in Atlanta, where she takes care of her Mom, sees clients, writes, and blogs.

Dr. Kathleen G. Nadeau PhD, ADD Expert and AuthorKathleen G. Nadeau, PhD is a clinical psychologist and director of the Chesapeake ADHD Center in Silver Spring, Maryland, where she continues to practice and provide supervision and training related to ADHD. She has been a leader in the field for the past 20 years, publishing over a dozen books on topics related to ADHD. In 1999, she received the CHADD Hall of Fame Award for her ground-breaking work on women and girls with ADHD. Dr. Nadeau is a frequent lecturer both nationally and internationally and is known for her solution-focused, integrative approach to treating ADHD. She has focused for many years on issues relating to organization, planning, and daily life management challenges faced by individuals with ADHD and first approached professional organizer Judith Kolberg in the late 1990s about the need for an organizing book that specifically addresses the particular challenges faced by adults with ADHD.

Did you like this? Share it:

The Get-Things-Done-Now-Guide for ADHDers

Sunday, February 2, 2014 @ 10:02 AM
posted by admin

Feeling overwhelmed, ADHD adults? Here are 11 how-to strategies for de-cluttering, managing paper, overcoming distraction and feeling less anxious about deadlines.

Did you like this? Share it:
off